22 March 2011

Getting back to Normal. Wow, what a few days I’ve had. We have some friends who had made Aliyah a couple of months before us and whom we had met at Ulpan. Life has a way of making decisions for us and, due to the health of his parents, they had to return, temporarily, to the States. We had them, and a few other people for Shabbat dinner Friday night and started eating the leftovers for Shabbat lunchSick smile. Howie and Alice, it was great seeing guys and can’t wait for you to return home to Jerusalem!Airplane Then Sunday was PurimPrincess in most of the world, but we Yerushalmis celebrate the next day, Sushan Purim. Since this is one of my favorite holidays, and since I miss two day Yomim Tovim from Chutz (yeah, right) I hold two days PurimSmile. So, for Purim Rishon, we went to our Son Alan in the Gush for his SeudaParty smile and brought the rest of Friday night’s leftovers (do you get the idea that we maybe prepared too much food?) and joined 25 other people the festivities. Then we drove back to Jerusalem to hear the Magilla on Shushan Purim. Yesterday, delivered Mesloach Manot, picked up some stuff, cleaned the house, set the table, finished cooking, and greeted our guests for our pot-luck SeudaPlate. Today I get to unpack all of our Mesloach Manot and try to return to normalWinking smile.


Just Not News

Iran, weapons,  Syria,  Hamas,  Gaza,  Missiles,  Japan,  Catastrophe,  Disasters,  Earthquakes, Tsunami, Nuclear, media : Dry Bones cartoon.
The stories this week that you may not have seen:

Reuters: Israel seizes ship carrying Iranian weapons to Gaza

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – “Israeli naval commandos on Tuesday seized a cargo ship in the Mediterranean carrying what Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said were Iranian-supplied weapons intended for Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip.

A military spokeswoman said Israeli forces met no resistance when they intercepted the German-owned “Victoria” some 200 miles from Israel and were taking the vessel to the Israeli port of Ashdod.” -more

And the weapons manuals were in Iranian (Farsi)

Navy: Anti-ship missiles, Farsi manual found on seized vessel

“IDF estimates some 50 tons of weapons found on Gaza-bound ‘Victoria’ vessel intercepted by commandoes; Rear Admiral Ben-Yehuda says Chinese-made C-704 anti-ship missiles would have threatened Israeli sea-based strategic installations, navy vessels had they reached Strip. Containers were loaded after Iranian ships docked in Syria two weeks ago, he adds” -more

And then a day later (yesterday, March 17 ) The Australian ran this story:

Turks order Iran transport plane to land

“An Iranian cargo plane en route to Syria was forced to land in Turkey last night amid fears it may be carrying military or nuclear material.

The plane was being searched at Diyarbakir airport in southeastern Turkey a day after Israeli commandos operating deep in international waters boarded a ship carrying arms allegedly on their way from Iran to Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip.

The plane, which took off yesterday from Tehran bound for the Syrian city of Aleppo, landed following an order from the Turkish foreign ministry.

Two F-16 jet fighters were put on standby to intervene if the Iranian plane did not obey the orders to land, security sources said.

Anti-nuclear, biological and chemical material units of civilian defence teams took part in the inspection of the plane, Anatolia news agency reported.” -more

-Dry Bones- Israel’s Political Comic Strip Since 1973

Inflammatory Material

BDS, IAW, Boycott, Sanctions, Apartheid, antisemitism, Delegitimization, Lag Ba'Omer, Education : Dry Bones cartoon.
Back in October, I was in Boston for a conference at Boston University sponsored by the good folks at CAMERA. As I strolled into the venue at BU with Louise (a friend and fellow activist) we were greeted by a small but noisy and colorful contingent of anti-Israel demonstrators. The chanting, drum-beating, horn-blowing, Arab head scarf-wearing students were trying to hand out their anti-Zionist libels and “fact sheets” to passersby and to would-be conference attendees.

Other folks were furious and stopped to argue with the demonstrators, but not my friend Louise. Nope.

What Louise (Lulu to some) does in such situations is nothing short of brilliant. Amazed at what she did, I turned it into a Dry Bones cartoon (with a thanx to Lulu next to my signature). So if you decide to follow Lulu’s (and now my advice) remember to save the inflammatory material for Lag Ba’Omer, the bonfire holiday of the Jewish people. The holiday will start this year on Saturday night May 21 and continue till nightfall Sunday May 22. By the way, on Sunday May 22 I’m scheduled to speak at a Lag Ba’Omer lunch in Fresno California and then I’ll be flying off to an appearance that evening in LA. I’ll post dates of the May2011 speaking tour as soon as everything is in place. On May 26 I’ll be appearing in the Boston area (and hope to get some more strategic advice from Lulu).

We’ve still got a couple of open dates left for the May2011 tour, so if your Church, Synagogue, or Community Organization wants to book a Z Street, Young Israel-sponsored Dry Bones event do it now. Please contact plerner@youngisrael.org. But this is the last week to book!

-Dry Bones- Israel’s Political Comic Strip Since 1973

the New Middle East (1991)

Today’s cartoon is from twenty years ago this month! Back then the media and all the pundits explained that as soon as the dust of war settled we would witness the birth of a “New Middle East”. So I did a full page cartoon.

* * *

Click on the cartoon below to open a larger, more readable version of this full page Dry Bones:1991 Dry Bones cartoon -the New Middle East

Another one of those cartoons that could be run today, as is, without any change!!

-Dry Bones- Israel’s Political Comic Strip Since 1973


Photos: Purim in Hevron and IDF Foils Arab Attack on Purim in Hevron Israeli soldiers foiled an attempted Arab terrorist attack on Jewish visitors on Purim in Hevron. In Gaza, terrorist group says it fired mortars.

This is the son of a very good friend, and a very meaningful read.

The Absurdity of “Comfort”
© Shimon Apisdorf 9 Adar - 3/15/11

Today I was praying for the children, the siblings, the parents and the grandparents.
For what is left of the Fogel family.
And it all felt so absurd; the words clanged hollow and meaningless.
“May you be comforted,” I whispered in my prayer, while my heart and mind knew those
words were a lie.
Comfort. I should wish them comfort? What chutzpah. How absurd.
Isn’t it clear that “comfort”
 —nechama in Hebrew— is impossible.
Those who they love more than themselves were savagely butchered, and I imagine that
there is some sort of comfort? As if some day they will be able to “get past this tragedy;”
or “move on with their lives;” or “come to terms with what happened;” or be
“comforted?”
Clearly, the Fogel’s horror is too enormous for comfort.
This cosmic horror that gruesomely shreds every Jewish heart, defies comfort and
consolation.
What then can I pray for?
What can anyone possibly say to them, ever?
And then a thought arose; geula, redemption. The only possible source of comfort is
redemption. The redemption of Am Yisroel, of the Jewish People; only that could be big
enough, transcendent enough, to possibly be a source of comfort.
Perhaps this is what our sages have been trying to teach us all these many centuries.
The traditional words that we utter to
 mourner’s in a shiva house (a house where Jews are
mourning the death of a loved one), are—“May God comfort you amongst those who are
mourning for Zion and Jerusalem.”
I ask you, do those words make sense? Wouldn’t it be more appropriate to say, “May
God comfort you amongst those who have also lost their loved ones.” Isn’t there some
small measure of comfort in knowing that others have experienced similar suffering, a
similar loss, and then found comfort. If I lost a beloved brother, what does it mean that I
should be comforted “amongst those who are mourning for Zion and Jerusalem.”? Okay,
so there are people in this world who still feel sad about the destruction of Jerusalem, but
what does that have to do with the loss of my brother, and my comfort?
Maybe, just maybe, there is no true comfort for anyone, until there is ultimate comfort for
everyone. And maybe now I have some idea of what
 to pray for.
Hamakom yi’nachen etchem b’toch shaar availei Tzion v’Yerusholayim.
May God comfort you amongst those who are mourning for Zion and Jerusalem.
And may God comfort the entire Nation of Israel—with redemption.

Dovid Winiarz
7:25pm Mar 17

The Absurdity of “Comfort”
© Shimon Apisdorf 9 Adar – 3/15/11
Today I was praying for the children, the siblings, the parents and the grandparents.
For what is left of the Fogel family.
And it all felt so absurd; the words clanged hollow and meaningless.
“May you be comforted,” I whispered in my prayer, while my heart and mind knew those
words were a lie. Comfort. I should wish them comfort? What chutzpah. How absurd.
Isn’t it clear that “comfort” —nechama in Hebrew— is impossible.
Those who they love more than themselves were savagely butchered, and I imagine that
there is some sort of comfort? As if some day they will be able to “get past this tragedy;”
or “move on with their lives;” or “come to terms with what happened;” or be “comforted?”
Clearly, the Fogel’s horror is too enormous for comfort.
This cosmic horror that gruesomely shreds every Jewish heart, defies comfort and
consolation.
What then can I pray for?
What can anyone possibly say to them, ever?
And then a thought arose; geula, redemption. The only possible source of comfort is
redemption. The redemption of Am Yisroel, of the Jewish People; only that could be big
enough, transcendent enough, to possibly be a source of comfort.
Perhaps this is what our sages have been trying to teach us all these many centuries.
The traditional words that we utter to mourner’s in a shiva house (a house where Jews are
mourning the death of a loved one), are—“May God comfort you amongst those who are
mourning for Zion and Jerusalem.”
I ask you, do those words make sense? Wouldn’t it be more appropriate to say, “May
God comfort you amongst those who have also lost their loved ones.” Isn’t there some
small measure of comfort in knowing that others have experienced similar suffering, a
similar loss, and then found comfort. If I lost a beloved brother, what does it mean that I
should be comforted “amongst those who are mourning for Zion and Jerusalem.”? Okay,
so there are people in this world who still feel sad about the destruction of Jerusalem, but
what does that have to do with the loss of my brother, and my comfort?
Maybe, just maybe, there is no true comfort for anyone, until there is ultimate comfort for
everyone. And maybe now I have some idea of what to pray for. Hamakom yi’nachen etchem b’toch shaar availei Tzion v’Yerusholayim.
May God comfort you amongst those who are mourning for Zion and Jerusalem.
And may God comfort the entire Nation of Israel—with redemption.

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2 thoughts on “22 March 2011

    • You are welcome, now I know who you are and how highly I hold your mother in esteem, she is one special lady, almost as special as my wife. Shabbat Shalom.

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